More on the B17 Crash Dedication
Some of the artifacts found at the crash
site in April 2009, including metal
fragments, a spark plug, gun sight, and
shells
Group member Marek
Dziewa is a professional
artist who focuses on the
aircraft and events the
group researches. He made
this pencil drawing for Jan
of her uncle's plane,
spewing smoke from the
engine. The drawing, titled
"Last Flight", includes the
insignia and ID numbers of
the plane.
The ID plate on the gun sight was still
legible, manufactured by the S.F.
Bowser Co. of Ft. Wayne IN.
Jan Loftis with Richard Graff, who remembers
shoveling dirt onto the fire at the crash site.
Richard identified the location of Anthony's
body. Sixtyfour years later the parachute clasp
was found in the same spot. He says the crash
memories are "fest", or set, in his mind.
Collecting dirt from where her
uncle lay. "I feel like he's more
here than in the grave back
home."
Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and
swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there
I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air.
Up, up the long delirious, burning blue,
I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
Where never lark, or even eagle flew -
And, while with silent lifting mind I've trod
The high untresspassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand and touched the face of God.

Pilot Officer Gillespie Magee
No 412 squadron, RCAF
Killed 11 December 1941
The poem "High Flight" was read
at Anthony's funeral in 1944, and
also
at the placement of the cross at the
crash site 15 April 2009.
In October 2010, pilot Sterling Bristol's
84 year old brother David visited the
crash site as a guest of the group.
David was in Navy training in 1944
when he learned of the death of his 22
year old brother. Another Bristol
brother was trained as a pilot and flew
during the war.
Sterling Bristol is buried in the American
Cemetery at St. Avold (an hour east of the
KMC), and David visited his grave for the first
time during the visit. More photos of Mr.
Bristol's visit, with his family, are on the
Flugzeugabstuerze website (scroll down).